Under the Apple Tree: Elisa Lendvay & Becky Yazdan with works by Judith Simonian and Michael Angelis

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Under the Apple Tree: Elisa Lendvay & Becky Yazdan with works by Judith Simian and Michael Angelis
September 9, 2017 – October 7, 2017

Artists Talk is Saturday, October 7th, 2PM

Fred Giampietro Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of works by Elisa Lendvay and Becky Yazdan, with works by Judith Simian and Michael Angelis.

 

“The Apple Tree can be seen as a sanctuary or a shelter, or it can be seen as beautiful temptation, offering poisonous fruit. In Shel Silverstein’s The Giving Tree, the apple tree exists to make the boy happy, offering fruit to eat, branches to swing on and lumber to build a house. The boy returns as a tired old man and the tree, having sacrificed everything, has nothing left but a stump for him to sit on.”

“And the tree was happy…but not really.” – Yazdan

In a recent statement, Yazdan describes her new work, “This particular body of work focuses on transitions and change and the violence and inevitable resistance that come along with it. In order for the caterpillar to turn into the butterfly it must digest itself with its own enzymes. For one to move forward, things must be left behind — how do you decide what stays and what goes? Do you keep the baby or does it get thrown out with the bath water?”

New York based artist, Becky Yazdan received her MFA from the NY Studio School, studying with Bill Jensen and Graham Nickson. She received her Bachelors of Fine Art from the University of Colorado at Boulder. Yazdan’s work has been exhibited throughout the East Coast and New York and she has received many prestigious awards including the Emma Strain Award, Top 100 Artists by GLAAD, and the Hohenberg Travel Award.

Click here to view available works by Yazdan

Lendvay’s explorations in making form, color and enigmatic objects move between sculpture, painting and drawing. They present interplays among internal vision, observation of nature, and corporality to generate moments of perception, truth, and whimsey. Diverse materials are employed to consider how unlike elements can merge into something other and new. She explores the physicality of making and matter with a sense of play and discovery in the process.

Elisa Lendvay’s recent solo exhibitions have been at Jason McCoy Gallery, New York, NY and Fred Giampietro Gallery, New Haven, CT, and group exhibitions nationally and internationally. She recently moved from NYC to a farmhouse in the Hudson Valley, NY. Lendvay holds an MFA in Sculpture from Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, and a BFA from the University of Texas at Austin and Bennington College. Lendvay has been awarded honors from the Edward F. Albee Foundation, the New York Foundation of the Arts, the Santa Fe Art Institute, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Center, the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, the Dallas Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, and the Marie Walsh Art Foundation. She is teaching at Marist College and is a visiting faculty member at Bennington for fall 2017.

Click here to view available works by Lendvay

Judith Simonian lives and works in New York City. She was born in Los Angeles, California and received her M.A. and B.A. from California State University, Northridge. She was awarded a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship in 2014. Simonian’s work has been exhibited throughout the United States. Her work has been included in many public collections including the Broad Art Foundation in Paris, France, UCLA/Hammer Museum, the Museum of Contemporary Art in San Diego, the Fresno Museum of Art, and the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art in Madison, WI.

Click here to view available works by Simonian

 

Michael Angelis lives and works in New Haven, CT. He obtained a BFA of sorts from SUNY Purchase in 2001, and a Masters of Art Education from Teachers College in 2005. He teaches high school and dabbles in printmaking and oil painting.

 

Click here to view available works by Michael Angelis

 

 

 

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Enrico Riley at Dartmouth after returning from a residency through the American Academy in Rome

Enrico Riley has just returned from the American Academy in Rome and his most recent work is on view at Dartmouth! Please see images below for more information.

Click here to view available works 

Click here to view Gorky’s Granddaughter’s interview with Enrico

ERIRRiley


Enrico Riley ’95 Wins Rome Prize

The artist will spend next year painting and studying Renaissance masters in Italy.

Associate Professor of Studio Art Enrico Riley ’95 has won a 2016 Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome.

Given annually to about 30 exceptional emerging artists and scholars from around the United States, the Rome Prize will provide studio space, lodging, and a stipend to allow Riley to spend close to a year living—and painting—in the Italian capital.

“The Rome Prize is a huge honor for Professor Riley,” says Barbara Will, associate dean for the arts and humanities. “It is a once-in-a-lifetime achievement, and a shining testament to his national and international reputation as a painter. We are thrilled to be able to share in his success.”

“I’m excited to be going,” Riley says. “It’s something I’ve wanted to do for a long time. It’s just an amazing chance to be dislocated but also extremely focused in my own research.”

In addition to the uninterrupted time to work in the studio that the prize will afford him, Riley says he looks forward to interacting with the community of Rome Prize Fellows and to immersing himself in the art of Italy.

“I’m working on a relatively new body of work dealing with some of the mechanics of painting from late medieval Italian painting into the Renaissance—looking at some of the strategies for pictorial structure that artists such as Duccio or Pietro Cavallini or Giotto use,” he says.

“Those painters are really important to me, in particular with regard to the way that I’m making paintings now. Obviously you can find reproductions of their work online or in print, but it’s a whole other situation to be physically where they are and embedded in the country and the culture where they were made.”

Earlier in his career, Riley primarily worked in abstract forms. But recently his paintings have taken a figurative turn, often reflecting Riley’s perspective on social issues and his personal experience.

Whereas before the artist played with star-like constellation patterns and sharp color contrasts, now his 60-by-48-inch canvases are filled with images of upside-down nude figures, ropes, and gun barrels, against often bright blue backgrounds.

Asked about the evolution of his painting, Riley says, “The act of painting doesn’t exist isolated from time; it responds to the artist’s development as a human being, and as you move through life and have different experiences, how you paint changes, subtly or drastically.”

“It’s really quite mysterious,” he says. “I could give you an explanation, but I think it would slip through my fingers as soon as I uttered it. What I will say is that your art has to respond to what’s changing in your life. At least for me, that’s extremely important. So my new work is a reflection of where I find myself.”

This is not the first time Riley’s work has been recognized. In 2008, he received a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, and his painting Giant Steps won the American Academy of Arts and Letters Purchase Prize. His paintings are in the collections of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Columbus Museum of Art, the Nasher Museum of Art, and Dartmouth.

Riley majored in visual studies at Dartmouth, where he discovered that his passion for music translated into his paintings. “There’s something about playing a lot of music that somehow made me receptive to the abstract qualities of the painting medium,” he says.

He went on to earn his MFA in painting at Yale and returned to Hanover to teach in 2001. For him, teaching and making art go hand in hand. “For me, being very active in my studio and continuing to exhibit my work allow me to teach painting and drawing as a lived subject.”

Richard Lytle: A Retrospective at Fairfield University Art Museum Sep. 14, 2017 – Feb. 3, 2017

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What an amazing exhibition. Please make a point to see Richard Lytle: A Retrospective at Fairfield University Art Museum – Walsh Gallery. The exhibition is now open and runs through February 3, 2018. An artist’s talk will take place on Tuesday, September 19th at 5pm. Richard also has incredible exterior architectural reliefs (1964-5) located on the Barone Campus Student Center. Included in the exhibition is an early work loaned by the Yale University Art Gallery and a piece that was included in the Sixteen Americans exhibition at MOMA

 

 

Barone Student Center at Fairfield Universtiy:

 

Sixteen Americans exhibition: 

Click here to view the catalogue

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Richard Lytle, Possessed, 1959, oil on canvas, 98″ x 79″

Yale University Art Gallery Loan:

Click here to see the Museum’s collection of Lytle’s work

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Richard Lytle, Arrival, 1962, oil on canvas, 72.25″ x 84.125″

Gorky’s Granddaughter Interview with Richard Lytle – Feb 2014

 

Richard Lytle: A Retrospective at Fairfield University Museum (Walsh Gallery) Sept. 15, 2017 – Feb. 3, 2018

Richard Lytle: A Retrospective

at Fairfield University Museum (Walsh Gallery)

Sept. 15, 2017 – Feb. 3, 2018

Opening reception is Thursday, Sept. 14th, 6-730pm

Artist Talk’s is Tuesday, Sept. 19th, 5pm

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Richard Lytle (American, b. 1935) has been exhibiting his work internationally since the mid-1950s. He attended the Cooper Union, then graduated from Yale University with a BFA in 1957 and from Yale College of Art with an MFA in 1960. While still in graduate school, he was selected for Dorothy Miller’s seminal 1959 “Sixteen Americans” at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. He was in auspicious company, as this exhibition introduced the museum-going world to Jasper Johns, Frank Stella, Robert Rauschenberg, Louise Nevelson and Ellsworth Kelly among others.

Lytle’s paintings and drawings have been included in many solo and group exhibitions including at the Whitney Museum of American Art, Yale University Art Gallery, Harvard University and elsewhere, and have been featured at American Embassies around the world and at the World’s Fair in Seattle. He has received many prestigious awards including the Saint-Gaudens Medal and the Citation for Professional Achievement from Cooper Union. His work is to be found in many public and private collections including the Yale University Art Gallery, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Williams College Museum of Art.

RL_1959_thepossessed_oc_98x79Mastery of color is a hallmark of Lytle’s work, which ranges from realist to abstraction, and which has always found its inspiration in the organic world. His dreamlike images move across spaces suggestive of landscapes, often in joyful biomorphic abstraction. Some focus on plants and natural shapes that are magnified beyond recognition, while others include elements chosen by the artist for their sensuous colors and patterning.

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Richard Lytle’s connection to Fairfield University dates back to a commission he received for drawings for the exterior bas-relief sculptures for the Barone Campus Center in 1965.  The sculptures are now visible inside and on the exterior of the newly completed Tully Dining Commons building.  Organized as part of the celebration of Fairfield University’s 75th anniversary, this retrospective is a celebration of that long relationship.  It includes Lytle’s original drawings for the bas-reliefs – a recent gift to the museum from the artist – early charcoal drawings from the 1960s Nude Figures Series, a selection of Pod Series drawings from the 1970s, as well as watercolors and large oil paintings spanning the breadth of Lytle’s career.

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Generous support for the exhibition is provided by the Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Foundation.

The Opening Reception for “Under the Apple Tree,” featuring the work of Elisa Lendvay & Becky Yazdan, with works by Judith Simian and Michael Angelis is Saturday, Sept. 9th, 6-8pm

Under the Apple Tree

September 9 – October 7, 2017

Please join us tonight for the opening reception of our exhibition featuring the work of Elisa Lendvay and Becky Yazdan titled, “Under the Apple Tree” Judith Simonian and Michael Angelis will also have a special selection of works on view.

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“The Apple Tree can be seen as a sanctuary or a shelter, or it can be seen as beautiful temptation, offering poisonous fruit. In Shel Silverstein’s The Giving Tree, the apple tree exists to make the boy happy, offering fruit to eat, branches to swing on and lumber to build a house. The boy returns as a tired old man and the tree, having sacrificed everything, has nothing left but a stump for him to sit on.”

“And the tree was happy…but not really.” – Yazdan

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New York based artist, Becky Yazdan received her MFA from the NY Studio School, studying with Bill Jensen and Graham Nickson. She received her Bachelors of Fine Art from the University of Colorado at Boulder. Yazdan’s work has been exhibited throughout the East Coast and New York and she has received many prestigious awards including the Emma Strain Award, Top 100 Artists by GLAAD, and the Hohenberg Travel Award.

Elisa Lendvay’s recent solo exhibitions have been at Jason McCoy Gallery, New York, NY and Fred Giampietro Gallery, New Haven, CT, and group exhibitions nationally and internationally. She recently moved from NYC to a farmhouse in the Hudson Valley, NY. Lendvay holds an MFA in Sculpture from Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, and a BFA from the University of Texas at Austin and Bennington College. Lendvay has been awarded honors from the Edward F. Albee Foundation, the New York Foundation of the Arts, the Santa Fe Art Institute, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Center, the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, the Dallas Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, and the Marie Walsh Art Foundation. She is teaching at Marist College and is a visiting faculty member at Bennington for fall 2017.

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Judith Simonian lives and works in New York City. She was born in Los Angeles, California and received her M.A. and B.A. from California State University, Northridge. She was awarded a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship in 2014. Simonian’s work has been exhibited throughout the United States. Her work has been included in many public collections including the Broad Art Foundation in Paris, France, UCLA/Hammer Museum, the Museum of Contemporary Art in San Diego, the Fresno Museum of Art, and the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art in Madison, WI.

Michael Angelis lives and works in New Haven, CT. He obtained a BFA of sorts from SUNY Purchase in 2001, and a Masters of Art Education from Teachers College in 2005. He teaches high school and dabbles in printmaking and oil painting.

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Enrico Riley featured in Art New England & An exhibition at Nearburg Gallery, BVAC – Dartmouth College -September 11th

Enrico Riley

By: Molly Zapp

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Enrico Riley working in his Rome studio. Photo: altrospaziophotography.com.

As the videos showing African-American men dying at the hands of police were released, artist Enrico Riley happened to run out of his vivid chromatic paints, and his work took a new direction. It was a moment for him and our country; the ongoing conversation about color, race and representation had been amplified.

Over these last three or four years, Riley’s work has shifted from somewhat surrealist to gestural, specific scenes that address issues that are “really sticky, really complicated.” He began painting images of violence—such as a lynching, in Untitled: Black Bodies, Infinite Receptors—that he never thought he would paint, he says on an unseasonably chilly July day in his Lebanon, NH studio. The painter, professor and father of two cites the 2014 death of Eric Garner, an African-American dad who died in police custody in New York, as his “emotional tipping point.” “Whether you like it or not,” he says, “The things you are thinking about will show up in your work.” Garner’s death coincided with him running out of bright cadmium paints. In his earlier works, his figures were often boldly colored—cadmium red, bright green, black or blue. Many of these earlier figures were portraits in a noncontextualized background. Without his usual palette, yet still wanting to paint, he began to work with the earth-toned paints he had around. He painted a figure diving into a pool with gun barrels pointed toward him. “I think it was a sienna color—and the figure automatically had a racial identity, just from that one slight shift,” he says. “I had to come to terms with, and understand that now I was making paintings that were dealing with race.”
Riley, 43, speaks with a quiet intensity. He comes across as serious and thoughtful, yet when his smile finally breaks through, it is warm and genuine. He’s an associate professor of studio art at Dartmouth, his alma mater, and an award-winning artist, receiving a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2008. He is freshly back from Rome, where he spent ten months painting and drawing at the American Academy as a recipient of the Rome Prize. In Italy, he found the historical infrastructure and drier landscape inspiring for his art. Speaking very limited Italian, he says he was able to
take in his surroundings less verbally and more visually.

One painting he worked on in Rome during the presidential election, Untitled: Respect, has the shoes and legs of a dark-skinned woman in a ballot box, framed by a curtain. On the golden wooden floor, there is fallen paper—perhaps ballot stubs or enlarged hanging chads. The woman’s legs look sturdy in her wedge heels, as if she is taking her civic duty seriously in a way her grandparents were prevented from doing.

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Enrico Riley, Untitled: Black Bodies, Infinite Receptors, 2015, 60 x 48″. Photo: Molly Zapp.

The son of a mother who immigrated from Jamaica and a father who is from the Northeast, Riley was born in Connecticut but grew up in Richmond, VA. He says he wants his art to engage viewers in ways that might not be easy. “I want people to think about race in our society, and I wouldn’t be making these paintings if I didn’t,” he says. “I want people to be thinking about violence inside of the African-American community, about violence amongst humans in general. The question for me is, how do you paint about it in a way that takes into account how complicated those issues are?”

That his works are gestural helps Riley avoid being didactic or heavy-handed, though certainly his work is intense and appropriately challenging for viewers. Sometimes it’s difficult to tell if the body parts depicted in his paintings are hands or feet, but that they are the splayed-out or tied-up limbs of a person of color in a dangerous situation is clear. In Untitled: Flagellation, False Confession, a red-toned arm is shown hanging from a rope. A light-skinned arm holds a black baton that is hitting the arm of the person who is tied up. In the background is an achingly beautiful sky—cerulean and cornflower with touches of navy. The painting serves as a reminder that people choose to inflict violence under clear blue skies, and that suffering occurs in picturesque places—beauty and brutality are not always confined to separate spheres. It also showcases the sickening physical intimacy between the bodies of the people involved in acts of violence. Untitled: Midnight, Hunting, appears humorous at first glance, as the viewer’s eye first goes to the backside and tail of a white dog against an olive green fence. But then the rest comes into focus: a gun barrel, two black hands, and a brass instrument on the other side of the fence. Even the perception of the dog shifts: Are canines a beloved part of the family, or an animal used by authorities to police you?

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Enrico Riley, Untitled: Respect, 2016, oil on canvas, 53 x 49″. Photo: Molly Zapp.

Riley says that he draws nearly every day, and that his drawings serve as the beginnings for his paintings. He says he’s been thinking about the works of Goya, Philip Guston and the Italian Baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi as historical antecedents to his work. Riley has been experimenting with new media works that combine visual art and sound, as well. In Rome, he met and started collaborating with the Stanford University-based classical composer Jonathan Berger, also a recipient of a Rome prize. They began their current project, I Can’t Breathe, with similar ideas in their minds. (“I can’t breathe” is the sentence Eric Garner uttered as he was dying in a police chokehold.) Riley started to make drawings based on close listenings of Berger’s music, and Berger, in turn, composed music in response to Riley’s drawings. A video work of this project will be shown at Stanford this fall, and a live musical performance, along with the visual art, will be performed there in October.

Riley says that some people find his art extremely emotional, but these depictions of vulnerability are central to his work. “I think it’s important for us to remember that we are vulnerable…and to periodically, or even more than periodically, remember that we can be made vulnerable very quickly,” he says. His art serves as a powerful reminder that American beauty, struggle and brutality often exist in the same view.


Molly Zapp writes about American culture. She lives in northern Vermont.

Click here to view the article on ArtNewEngland.com


Riley

Richard Lytle: A Retrospective @ Fairfield Museum Sept. 15, 2017 – Feb 3, 2018

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Richard Lytle: A Retrospective will be on view at the Fairfield University Art Museum from September 15, 2017 – February 3, 2018; an Opening Reception will take place on Thursday, September 14, from 6-7:30 pm in the Walsh Gallery in the Quick Center for the Arts. The exhibition and reception are free and open to the public.

Richard Lytle (American, b. 1935) has been exhibiting his work internationally since the mid-1950s. He attended the Cooper Union, then graduated from Yale University with a BFA in 1957 and from Yale College of Art with an MFA in 1960. While still in graduate school, he was selected for Dorothy Miller’s seminal 1959 “Sixteen Americans” at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. He was in auspicious company, as this exhibition introduced the museum-going world to Jasper Johns, Frank Stella, Robert Rauschenberg, Louise Nevelson and Ellsworth Kelly among others.

RL_1959_thepossessed_oc_98x79

Lytle’s paintings and drawings have been included in many solo and group exhibitions including at the Whitney Museum of American Art, Yale University Art Gallery, Harvard University and elsewhere, and have been featured at American Embassies around the world and at the World’s Fair in Seattle. He has received many prestigious awards including the Saint-Gaudens Medal and the Citation for Professional Achievement from Cooper Union. His work is to be found in many public and private collections including the Yale University Art Gallery, the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Williams College Museum of Art.

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Mastery of color is a hallmark of Lytle’s work, which ranges from realist to abstraction, and which has always found its inspiration in the organic world. His dreamlike images move across spaces suggestive of landscapes, often in joyful biomorphic abstraction. Some focus on plants and natural shapes that are magnified beyond recognition, while others include elements chosen by the artist for their sensuous colors and patterning.

RL_1965_LeftNorth_photograph_JABCC_FFU

Richard Lytle’s connection to Fairfield University dates back to a commission he received for drawings for the exterior bas-relief sculptures for the Barone Campus Center in 1965. The sculptures are now visible inside and on the exterior of the newly completed Tully Dining Commons building. Organized as part of the celebration of Fairfield University’s 75th anniversary, this retrospective is a celebration of that long relationship. It includes Lytle’s original drawings for the bas-reliefs – a recent gift to the museum from the artist – early charcoal drawings from the 1960s Nude Figures Series, a selection of Pod Series drawings from the 1970s, as well as watercolors and large oil paintings spanning the breadth of Lytle’s career.

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Under the Apple Tree: Elisa Lendvay & Becky Yazdan with works by Judith Simonian

Opening Reception is THIS Saturday, September 9th, 6-8pm

Under the Apple Tree: Elisa Lendvay & Becky Yazdan with works by Judith Simonian

September 9, 2017 – October 7, 2017

Opening Reception is Saturday, September 9th, 6 – 8 PM

Artists Talk is Saturday, September 23rd, 2PM

Fred Giampietro Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of works by Elisa Lendvay and Becky Yazdan, with works by Judith Simonian.

“The Apple Tree can be seen as a sanctuary or a shelter, or it can be seen as beautiful temptation, offering poisonous fruit. In Shel Silverstein’s The Giving Tree, the apple tree exists to make the boy happy, offering fruit to eat, branches to swing on and lumber to build a house. The boy returns as a tired old man and the tree, having sacrificed everything, has nothing left but a stump for him to sit on.”

“And the tree was happy…but not really.” – Yazdan

BY_17_OctoberSky_48x36_OLP_RD

Becky Yazdan, October Sky, 2017, oil on linen on panel, 50″ x 44″ 

In a recent statement, Yazdan describes her new work, “This particular body of work focuses on transitions and change and the violence and inevitable resistance that come along with it. In order for the caterpillar to turn into the butterfly it must digest itself with its own enzymes. For one to move forward, things must be left behind — how do you decide what stays and what goes? Do you keep the baby or does it get thrown out with the bath water?”

New York based artist, Becky Yazdan received her MFA from the NY Studio School, studying with Bill Jensen and Graham Nickson. She received her Bachelors of Fine Art from the University of Colorado at Boulder. Yazdan’s work has been exhibited throughout the East Coast and New York and she has received many prestigious awards including the Emma Strain Award, Top 100 Artists by GLAAD, and the Hohenberg Travel Award.

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Elisa Lendvay, Yellow Thought Plane, 2017, mixed media, 8.5″ x 5″ x 6.5″

Lendvay’s explorations in making form, color and enigmatic objects move between sculpture, painting and drawing. They present interplays among internal vision, observation of nature, and corporality to generate moments of perception, truth, and whimsey. Diverse materials are employed to consider how unlike elements can merge into something other and new. She explores the physicality of making and matter with a sense of play and discovery in the process.

Elisa Lendvay’s recent solo exhibitions have been at Jason McCoy Gallery, New York, NY and Fred Giampietro Gallery, New Haven, CT, and group exhibitions nationally and internationally. She recently moved from NYC to a farmhouse in the Hudson Valley, NY. Lendvay holds an MFA in Sculpture from Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, and a BFA from the University of Texas at Austin and Bennington College. Lendvay has been awarded honors from the Edward F. Albee Foundation, the New York Foundation of the Arts, the Santa Fe Art Institute, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Center, the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, the Dallas Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, and the Marie Walsh Art Foundation. She is teaching at Marist College and is a visiting faculty member at Bennington for fall 2017.

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Judith Simonian, Landing Field, 2017, acrylic on canvas, 14″ x 18″

Judith Simonian lives and works in New York City. She was born in Los Angeles, California and received her M.A. and B.A. from California State University, Northridge. She was awarded a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship in 2014. Simonian’s work has been exhibited throughout the United States. Her work has been included in many public collections including the Broad Art Foundation in Paris, France, UCLA/Hammer Museum, the Museum of Contemporary Art in San Diego, the Fresno Museum of Art, and the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art in Madison, WI.

Becca Lowry • Jane Miller • Elana Herzog

Fred Giampietro gallery is pleased to bring together the works of Becca Lowry, Jane Miller, and Elana Herzog.  Each of these three artists practice deconstruction-reconstruction techniques in their respective works. They all use found and off-the-shelf materials yet the final outcome is transformative and firmly rooted in the Gestalt theory.unnamed.jpgBecca Lowry, While We’re Still Willing, 2017, mixed media on carved wood, 33″ x 28″ x 6.5″

Becca Lowry, New Haven, Connecticut-based artist Becca Lowry creates elaborate mixed-media works combining carved and collaged wood, oil and spray paint. Situated somewhere between sculpture and painting, the works have a three-dimensional quality that is intended to make them feel like precious objects. “As humans we have a tendency to hold on to special things,” Lowry says. “We collect objects that have particular meaning to us, we guard beautiful memories as best we can, we return to places that feel like home.” She explores similar themes in works on paper, by creating pastel rubbings from her more sculptural works.
Lowry received her BA in Economics with a certificate in African Studies from Smith College in North Hampton, MA. Lowry’s work has been exhibited throughout New England and can be found in many prestigious private collections.
unnamed.jpgJane Miller, D2, 2016, mixed media, 28″ x 18″ x 18″
Jane Miller lives and works in the New Haven area. She creates mixed-media textile sculptures through the manipulation of found and rescued fabrics. In a recent statement, Miller describes her current body of work as, . . . embracing sculpting methods using textiles from sustainable recycling of cloth, fiber and found objects. I combine weaving, wrapping, felting and hand sewing in abstract whimsical sculptures or large cocoon like amulets of variant sizes. Though domestic in nature it has little or nothing to do with domesticity other than a nod to materials used by women who craft out of an affiliation with these materials or the obsessive nature of crafted textile arts I embrace the spastic and weirdly beautiful combinations to cast aside tradition as much as possible . . . My work is less theoretical than just about making.”
Miller received her MFA from the University of Illinois and her BFA from the University of Iowa. Miller’s work has been exhibited throughout New England and New York and is represented in a number of respected private and public collections including Sol Lewitt, Universtiy of Wisconsin, and the Evansville Art Museum. Miller has been awarded a number of grants, honors and residencies including the Kenyon College Faculty Research Grant, the NEA City/State Initiative Grant, a residency at the Vermont Studio Center, the MacDowell Colony, and the St. Andrew’s-Sewanne School.
unnamed-1.jpgElana Herzog, Untitled, P2015-105, paper pulp, textile, 31″ x 24″
Elana Herzog lives and works in New York City. She is a recipient of a 2017 Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship. Herzog has had solo exhibitions a the Sharjah Art Museum, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, Studio 10 in Bushwick, New York, The Boiler(Pierogi), in Brooklyn, the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art in Connecticut; Smack Mellon in New York; the Herbert F. Johnson Museum at Cornell University; Lmak Projects and Morgan Lehman Gallery, and PPOW Gallery in New York City Diverseworks in Houston, Texas. De-Warped and Un-Weft, a survey of Herzog’s work since 1993, was at the Daum Museum of Contemporary Art in Missouri in 2009. Her work has been exhibited internationally in Norway, Sweden and Iceland, Canada, Chile and the Netherlands, and she has participated in numerous group shows at institutions such as the Tang Museum in Saratoga Springs, New York, the Weatherspoon Museum in Greensboro, North Carolina, The Kohler Museum in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, David Castillo Gallery in Miami, and at The Brooklyn Museum and The Museum of Arts and Design New York City.
Herzog has been awarded residencies at the Albers Foundation, in Bethany, Connecticut, Søndre Green Farm in Noresund, Norway, Gertrude Contemporary in Melbourne, Australia, the Farpath Foundation in Dijon, France, the Marie Walsh Sharpe Space Program, LMCC Workspace and Dieu Donne Paper in New York. She received the Anonymous Was A Woman Award in 2009, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Award in 2007, NYFA Fellowships in 2007 and 1999, the 2004 Lillian Elliot Award, the 2003 Lambent Fund Fellowship and the 1999 Joan Mitchell Award. She was a lecturer at Yale University from 2012 – 2016.

Fred Giampietro Gallery is located across the street from the Yale University Art Gallery and the Yale Center for British Art, less than 1 mile from interstate I-91 and Union Railroad Station at 1064 Chapel St., New Haven, CT 06510. Gallery hours are Tuesday – Saturday 11am – 5pm or by appointment. For more information please call the Gallery at (203) 777-7760 or visit us on the web at http://www.GiampietroGallery.com