Becca Lowry • Jane Miller • Elana Herzog

Fred Giampietro gallery is pleased to bring together the works of Becca Lowry, Jane Miller, and Elana Herzog.  Each of these three artists practice deconstruction-reconstruction techniques in their respective works. They all use found and off-the-shelf materials yet the final outcome is transformative and firmly rooted in the Gestalt theory.unnamed.jpgBecca Lowry, While We’re Still Willing, 2017, mixed media on carved wood, 33″ x 28″ x 6.5″

Becca Lowry, New Haven, Connecticut-based artist Becca Lowry creates elaborate mixed-media works combining carved and collaged wood, oil and spray paint. Situated somewhere between sculpture and painting, the works have a three-dimensional quality that is intended to make them feel like precious objects. “As humans we have a tendency to hold on to special things,” Lowry says. “We collect objects that have particular meaning to us, we guard beautiful memories as best we can, we return to places that feel like home.” She explores similar themes in works on paper, by creating pastel rubbings from her more sculptural works.
Lowry received her BA in Economics with a certificate in African Studies from Smith College in North Hampton, MA. Lowry’s work has been exhibited throughout New England and can be found in many prestigious private collections.
unnamed.jpgJane Miller, D2, 2016, mixed media, 28″ x 18″ x 18″
Jane Miller lives and works in the New Haven area. She creates mixed-media textile sculptures through the manipulation of found and rescued fabrics. In a recent statement, Miller describes her current body of work as, . . . embracing sculpting methods using textiles from sustainable recycling of cloth, fiber and found objects. I combine weaving, wrapping, felting and hand sewing in abstract whimsical sculptures or large cocoon like amulets of variant sizes. Though domestic in nature it has little or nothing to do with domesticity other than a nod to materials used by women who craft out of an affiliation with these materials or the obsessive nature of crafted textile arts I embrace the spastic and weirdly beautiful combinations to cast aside tradition as much as possible . . . My work is less theoretical than just about making.”
Miller received her MFA from the University of Illinois and her BFA from the University of Iowa. Miller’s work has been exhibited throughout New England and New York and is represented in a number of respected private and public collections including Sol Lewitt, Universtiy of Wisconsin, and the Evansville Art Museum. Miller has been awarded a number of grants, honors and residencies including the Kenyon College Faculty Research Grant, the NEA City/State Initiative Grant, a residency at the Vermont Studio Center, the MacDowell Colony, and the St. Andrew’s-Sewanne School.
unnamed-1.jpgElana Herzog, Untitled, P2015-105, paper pulp, textile, 31″ x 24″
Elana Herzog lives and works in New York City. She is a recipient of a 2017 Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship. Herzog has had solo exhibitions a the Sharjah Art Museum, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, Studio 10 in Bushwick, New York, The Boiler(Pierogi), in Brooklyn, the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art in Connecticut; Smack Mellon in New York; the Herbert F. Johnson Museum at Cornell University; Lmak Projects and Morgan Lehman Gallery, and PPOW Gallery in New York City Diverseworks in Houston, Texas. De-Warped and Un-Weft, a survey of Herzog’s work since 1993, was at the Daum Museum of Contemporary Art in Missouri in 2009. Her work has been exhibited internationally in Norway, Sweden and Iceland, Canada, Chile and the Netherlands, and she has participated in numerous group shows at institutions such as the Tang Museum in Saratoga Springs, New York, the Weatherspoon Museum in Greensboro, North Carolina, The Kohler Museum in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, David Castillo Gallery in Miami, and at The Brooklyn Museum and The Museum of Arts and Design New York City.
Herzog has been awarded residencies at the Albers Foundation, in Bethany, Connecticut, Søndre Green Farm in Noresund, Norway, Gertrude Contemporary in Melbourne, Australia, the Farpath Foundation in Dijon, France, the Marie Walsh Sharpe Space Program, LMCC Workspace and Dieu Donne Paper in New York. She received the Anonymous Was A Woman Award in 2009, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Award in 2007, NYFA Fellowships in 2007 and 1999, the 2004 Lillian Elliot Award, the 2003 Lambent Fund Fellowship and the 1999 Joan Mitchell Award. She was a lecturer at Yale University from 2012 – 2016.

Fred Giampietro Gallery is located across the street from the Yale University Art Gallery and the Yale Center for British Art, less than 1 mile from interstate I-91 and Union Railroad Station at 1064 Chapel St., New Haven, CT 06510. Gallery hours are Tuesday – Saturday 11am – 5pm or by appointment. For more information please call the Gallery at (203) 777-7760 or visit us on the web at http://www.GiampietroGallery.com

“Root Rot” Chris Barnard with works by Michael Angelis

Root Rot CHRIS BARNARD 

with works by Michael Angelis

Open now through June 3rd at 1064 Chapel Street, New Haven, CT 

cropped-barnardangelis_openingreception_may2017_0253_ed_.jpg

Fred Giampietro gallery is pleased to present Root Rot, an exhibition of paintings by Chris Barnard.

In this body of work, Barnard focuses on White Supremacy’s relationship to the privileged spaces he frequents, such as art and educational institutions, and the role of those institutions in the perpetuation of racial violence. For Barnard, the particularities of the present socio-political context prompt an array of questions about painting—its purposes, possibilities, imperfections, and implications. What, for example, is and isn’t being depicted, is and isn’t being seen, in artwork? When wrestling with racial violence, what paths might be forged to illuminate without fetishizing, lay bare without lecturing, own up without self-congratulating? What might taking responsibility for Whiteness in order to renounce it look like, rendered in oil, on cotton cloth, stretched on trees? Is it even possible?

BarnardAngelis_MayJune2017_InstallImages_0020

Prolific twitter presence Son of Baldwin recently asked, Why do these white artists always want to depict black suffering, but never the white malice that causes it?” It’s an important question that Barnard engages in his work, attempting to place the perpetrators of racial violence where they so often are—exonerated, unindicted, in the middle of the frame, up on the pedestal, predators in plain sight.

BarnardAngelis_MayJune2017_InstallImages_0079_ED

In many of the compositions, which reference real spaces, Barnard has inserted fictional features that point to potential allegiances, investments, priorities, and unearned-and-yet-protected benefits. The resulting works are representational, but through gesture, color and surface manipulation, Barnard suggests instability, corrosion or decay. These works are the product of imperfect efforts to paint some of the evidence of things “seen” and “not seen” and to situate that evidence in ways that point back to our institutional and personal complicity with racism.

– Lauren Anderson, 2017

BarnardAngelis_MayJune2017_InstallImages_0070_ED

Barnard’s work has been shown in solo and group exhibitions in Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, and San Diego, among other locations. He received his BA from Yale and his MFA from The University of Southern California. He is an Assistant Professor of Art at Connecticut College and lives with his partner in New Haven, CT.

BarnardAngelis_MayJune2017_InstallImages_0073_ED

In a recent statement, Michael Angelis wrote, “This new body of work is by no means an apogee, it’s instead an ongoing exploration of process, repetition and iconography. The loose representational imagery is mostly rendered from memory, although some referential work is involved as well. The symbolism of that imagery has personal meaning around themes of value, loss, hierarchy, authenticity and consumption. These themes I feel have always been present in my work, but were expressed more outwardly or perhaps subjectively in earlier pieces . . . Each piece in this ongoing series will, I hope, eventually serve as a kind of hieroglyph in a language that explains my purpose for creating artwork and will continue to evolve through changes in life, imagery, and physical interaction with materials.” Michael Angelis lives and works in New Haven, CT. Angelis received an MEA from the Teachers College at Columbia and his BFA from SUNY Purchase. His work has been included in many local exhibits.

SweetSpotSeries_HeaderEmailBlast

MARK YOUR CALENDERS . . .

Our next Sweet Spot Series is Saturday, June 3, 2pm – Artist talk with Chris Barnard & Michael Angelis and a musical performance by Libby Van Cleve

 

DIALECTICAL PRAXIS Celia Johnson | Donald Martiny – Open now through April 29th

 DIALECTICAL PRAXIS
Celia Johnson | Donald Martiny
   
with works by Will Lustenader
Open now through April 29, 2017
Artist Talk is on Saturday, April 29, 2pm
    
FRED.GIAMPIETRO Gallery, 1064 Chapel Street, New Haven, CT 06510
JohnsonMartinyLustenader_OpeningReception_0195_EDRD
From left to right: Kathy & Fred Giampietro, Donald Martiny, and Celia Johnson
JohnsonMartinyInstall_April2017_0018_ED
Fred Giampietro gallery is pleased to present Dialectical Praxis, an exhibition featuring the work of Celia Johnson and Donald Martiny.  Although, Johnson and Martiny approach the process of creation with different points of view, interpretations, and methods, they both seek to establish the truth through reasoned arguments. Each artists share an affinity and uniqueness for the purity and simplicity of color and form.

JohnsonMartinyLustenader_OpeningReception_0246_EDRD

Donald Martiny has worked persistently on perfecting a unique technique of paint application so that he may, “discard the ground (canvas) and literally allow the brush strokes or gestures themselves to be the painting”.  Martiny is very conscious about being present in his work. He sees color as pure energy and feeling, allowing freedom to paint a gesture without any restraints creating a fresh and personal relationship with the viewer.
Donald Martiny studied at the School of the Visual Arts, The Art Students League in New York, New York University and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Museum exhibitions include the FWMoA, Courtauld Institute of Art, Alden B Dow Museum of Art, Falmouth Museum, and the Cameron Art Museum. In 2015 Martiny received a commission from the Durst Organization to create two monumental paintings that are permanently installed in the lobby of One World Trade Center in New York City. In 2015 Martiny received the Sam & Adele Golden Foundation for the Arts Residency Grant and his work has been featured in the Huffington Post, NPR, Philadelphia Inquirer, VOGUE LIVING |  Australia, New American Paintings | South and Woven Tale Press. Martiny’s work is represented by galleries in Europe, the US and Australia and is collected internationally.
JohnsonMartinyInstall_April2017_0004_ED
Celia Johnson is known for her sensitivity to surfaces, color theory and a unique interpretation of geometric abstraction. In her work, she carefully burnishes away marks challenging the viewer to further explore and question her technique.  In a recent statement, Johnson notes that she “enjoys persuading liquid paints, inks and hot glowing wax into counter intuitively distinct, bound, or embedded fields of pure saturated color.” Johnson enjoys structuring the figure/ground relationships and the push and pull of compositional elements in space.
Celia received her BFA in design and printmaking at California College of the Arts. She has worked professionally in the design field in San Francisco, New York and Germany for clients including Levis Strauss, ESPRIT, The New York Times and Condé Nast. While in Germany, she studied painting as a visiting student at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf under Prof. Christian Megert during a decade-long stay there. Returning to New York City, Celia pursued her concentration in painting while continuing to work professionally as an internationally recognized and award-winning designer/illustrator. Additionally she served as adjunct faculty at the Maryland Institute College of Art, and holds an MPS graduate degree in new media design from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts ITP program.
JohnsonMartinyLustenader_OpeningReception_0031_EDRD
Will Lustenader’s new body of work addresses spatial issues as well as the exploration of color and textural relationships. Lustenader’s masterful painterly technique draws a distant dialogue with renaissance through 19th-century painting as well as tipping his hat to the modern masters. Will Lustenader lives and works in New Haven, CT. Lustenader received his MA from the Courtauld Institute of Art at the University of London and his BA from Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, NY. His work has been included in numerous exhibits, including the San Diego Art Institute (2009), the Neuberger Museum (2008), and The New Britain Museum of American Art. His work can be found in many private and public collections.

Exhibition Opening April 1st: DIALECTICAL PRAXIS Celia Johnson | Donald Martiny

FRED.GIAMPIETRO Gallery, 1064 Chapel Street, New Haven, CT
April 1, 2017 – April 29, 2017

Artist Reception is on Saturday, April 1st, 6-8pm

Artist Talk is on Saturday, April 29th, 2pm

Celia Johnson has stated about her process; “I began to find my way only when I realized that the subject of my work can in fact be the work in progress itself: its evolving shapes, forms and colors accumulating to articulate a document of myself at a given moment in time.”

Her encaustic on wood pieces are born of curiosity and an engaging of an apolitically motivated aesthetic exploration of the space that they inhabit. Each of Johnson’s pieces is a record of the experience in making, a self reflection and captured moment represented in opaque fields of color edging, butting, overlapping and interacting within the finite space of the wood panel. Celia Johnson studied at the California College of the Arts and ITP, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University. She has exhibited her work internationally and lives and works in Chapel Hill, North Carolina

 

Donald Martiny is an Artist who’s work is designed with immediacy in mind. Martiny dismissed the conventional rectangular painting format in favor of unique, piece specific sculptural form. The goal of this system is to directly engage the viewer, to remove the window usually used as an entry to visually consumed Art in favor of work that approaches the onlooker. Through a process of trial and error Martiny has developed a unique pigment rich polymer with which he constructs his paintings, physically entering them during their formation, relating large bold form of brushstroke and the limits of his reach and constraints of his movement. In an interview with The Woven Tale Press in 2016, Martiny expressed “…let me make clear that these works are actual brushstrokes. Many people mistake them for sculptures or molds. They are not forms that have been painted, they are pure paint through and through that I make with large brushes or directly with my hands. Brushstrokes are human, personal, and intimate.” Donald Martiny has exhibited his work with the FWMoA, Courtauld Institute of Art, Alden B Dow Museum of Art, Falmouth Museum, and the Cameron Art Museum. Martiny’s work is also permanently installed in the lobby of One World Trade Center in New York City. He lives and works in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Cultivating Collectors: Panal Discussion Featuring Fernando Luis Alvarez, Isabella Garrucho, Fred Giampietro, and Amy Simon.

Mark your calendars for Thursday, March 30th, 6-8pm! The Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County and Silvermine Arts Center announce a series of conversations and events around the theme of Cultivating Collectors. Fred Giampietro, Fernando Luis Alvarez, Isabella Garrucho, and Amy Simon make up the panel for the “State of the Union” discussion, a review of the state of the business of art collecting and art sales locally and nationally. The panel will be moderated by Martha Willette Lewis. For more information please follow this link: Cultivating Collectors

https-cdn.evbuc.comimages28956097865347213231original

Sweet Spot Series: Thank You and Heads Up!

Thank you to everyone who attended the second installment of the FRED.GIAMPIETRO Gallery’s Sweet Spot Series on March 11th, which featured a breathtaking improvised musical performance with Taylor Ho Bynum and Carl Testa and engaging Artist talk with Zachary Keeting and Daniel John Gadd. If you missed out on attending this past installment, keep your schedule open for our third installment on June 3rd at 2pm featuring acclaimed musician Libby Van Cleve as well as an Artist talk with Chris Barnard and Michael Angelis. For more information on the upcoming Sweet Spot Series event, please visit our Future Exhibition page at Future Exhibitions at FRED.GIAMPIETRO Gallery.

Only Two Weeks Left to Catch Keeting and Gadd

FRED.GIAMPIETRO Gallery’s current exhibition; what a simple thing it seemed, that vast yellow light sailing slowly: Zachary Keeting and Daniel John Gadd

February 25, 2017 – March 25, 2017 

Zackary Keeting is a documenter and painter, whose work is an amalgam of loose gestural technique layered with refined tight lines, cracked and dissolving fields against deconstructed natural and invented forms and pattern. His human scale works on canvas and paper challenge interpretation with their battling assertions of both spontaneous and intentional structures in cohabitation. Keeting’s pieces can be both examples of the technical limits of his chosen medium and also symbolic representations of the recognizable and relatable, offering a viewer entry points marked with overt resistance.  

Daniel John Gadd is a Brooklyn based Artist who works with a plethora of materials and tools, both traditional and unexpected to create large scale mixed media constructions. His wall sculptures are representational of nature and personal experience, offering access by means of media and execution choices such as shattered mirrors and atypical non-symmetrical form paired with illustrative titles. Gadd’s work embraces an intentionally skewed geometry challenging notions of perfection while relating organic and human qualities.